VLC Together With Windows 10

vlc-win10-uwp

VLC Media Player Is Now A Universal Windows 10 App

VideoLan has built a universal Window platform (UWP) app for their popular VLC media player, meaning it will eventually work across Windows 10 devices, Hololens and Xbox One.

The new app is in beta but already appears to have some cool features. As with desktop versions, the app will support nearly every type of file format, will offer a media library for managing content within the app itself, subtitle support, sync controls (for those poorly dubbed files you definitely have) and picture-in-picture mode to allow you to browse your content without closing your current video.

Over time, DVD/Blu-ray playback and TV tuning will also be made available, but VideoLan says the current UWP APIs do not allow such features as of yet.

Get the app here: Microsoft Store

 

Additional Info: What Is VLC Media Player?

VLC media player (commonly known as VLC) is a portable, free and open-source, cross-platform media player and streaming media server written by the VideoLAN project. VLC is available for desktop operating systems and mobile platforms, such as Windows 10 Mobile, Windows Phone, Android, iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch. VLC is also available on App stores such as Apple’s App Store and Microsoft Windows Windows Store.

VLC media player supports many audio and video compression methods and file formats, including DVD-Video, video CD and streaming protocols. It is able to stream media over computer networks and to transcode multimedia files.[10]

The default distribution of VLC includes a large number of free decoding and encoding libraries, avoiding the need for finding/calibrating proprietary plugins. The libavcodec library from the FFmpeg project provides many of VLC’s codecs, but the player mainly uses its own muxers, and demuxers. It also has its own protocol implementations. It also gained distinction as the first player to support playback of encrypted DVDs on Linux and OS X by using the libdvdcss DVD decryption library.

 

What Is WIN-X (aka Windows 10)?

Windows 10 is a personal computer operating system developed and released by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. It was officially unveiled in September 2014 following a brief demo at Build 2014. The first version of the operating system entered a public beta testing process in October 2014, leading up to its consumer release on July 29, 2015.

Windows 10 introduces what Microsoft described as “universal apps“; expanding on Metro-style apps, these apps can be designed to run across multiple Microsoft product families with nearly identical code‍—‌including PCs, tablets, smartphones, embedded systems, Xbox One, Surface Hub and Windows Holographic. The Windows user interface was revised to handle transitions between a mouse-oriented interface and a touchscreen-optimized interface based on available input devices‍—‌particularly on 2-in-1 PCs; both interfaces include an updated Start menu which incorporates elements of Windows 7’s traditional Start menu with the tiles of Windows 8. The first release of Windows 10 also introduces a virtual desktop system, a window and desktop management feature called Task View, the Microsoft Edge web browser, support for fingerprint and face recognition login, new security features for enterprise environments, and DirectX 12 and WDDM 2.0 to improve the operating system’s graphics capabilities for games.

Microsoft described Windows 10 as an “operating system as a service” that would receive ongoing updates to its features and functionality, augmented with the ability for enterprise environments to receive non-critical updates at a slower pace, or use long-term support milestones that will only receive critical updates, such as security patches, over their five-year lifespan of mainstream support. Terry Myerson, executive vice president of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices Group, argued that the goal of this model was to reduce fragmentation across the Windows platform, as Microsoft aimed to have Windows 10 installed on at least one billion devices in the two to three years following its release.

Windows 10 received mostly positive reviews upon its original release in July 2015; critics praised Microsoft’s decision to downplay user-interface mechanics introduced by Windows 8 (including the full screen apps and Start screen) in non-touch environments to provide a desktop-oriented interface in line with previous versions of Windows, although Windows 10’s touch-oriented user interface mode was panned for containing regressions upon the touch-oriented interface of Windows 8. Critics also praised the improvements to Windows 10’s bundled software over 8.1, Xbox Live integration, as well as the functionality and capabilities of Cortana personal assistant and the replacement of Internet Explorer with Microsoft Edge.

Critics characterized the initial release of Windows 10 in July 2015 as being rushed, citing the incomplete state of some of the operating system’s bundled software (such as the Edge web browser), as well as the stability of the operating system itself on launch. Windows 10 was also criticized for limiting how users can control its operation, including limited controls over the installation of updates on the main consumer-oriented edition in comparison to previous versions. Privacy concerns were also voiced by critics and advocates, as the operating system’s default settings and certain features require the transmission of user data to Microsoft or its partners. Microsoft has also received criticism for how it has distributed Windows 10 to users of existing versions of Windows, which has included the automatic downloads of installation files to computers, the recurring display of pop-ups advertising the upgrade, and allegations of the installation process being scheduled or initiated automatically without expressed user consent.

As of June 2016, Windows 10 use is on the rise, with the previously most popular Windows 7 (and all other Microsoft’s versions) in (relative) decline; it has however not done so at a sufficient rate to prevent all Windows versions combined losing majority market share, with it now at less than 46% across the globe (judged by web use across all platforms). Other platforms are particularly strong in Australia, the US, UK, Sweden and Asia as a whole.

About the Author: GWN